Physics @ Berkeley
Physics in the News
Title: Graphene Under Strain Creates Gigantic Pseudo-Magnetic Fields
URL: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/news-releases/2010/07/29/graphene-under-stra
in/
Date: 07/29/2010
Publication: Berkeley Lab News Center
Editor:
Extended Text:

Graphene, the extraordinary form of carbon that consists of a single layer of carbon atoms, has produced another in a long list of experimental surprises. In the current issue of the journal Science, a multi-institutional team of researchers headed by Michael Crommie, a faculty senior scientist in the Materials Sciences Division at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, reports the creation of pseudo-magnetic fields far stronger than the strongest magnetic fields ever sustained in a laboratory – just by putting the right kind of strain onto a patch of graphene.

“We have shown experimentally that when graphene is stretched to form nanobubbles on a platinum substrate, electrons behave as if they were subject to magnetic fields in excess of 300 tesla, even though no magnetic field has actually been applied,” says Crommie. “This is a completely new physical effect that has no counterpart in any other condensed matter system.”

Read more at  http://newscenter.lbl.gov/news-releases/2010/07/29/graphene-under-strain/.