Physics @ Berkeley
Other Physical Sciences Majors Print E-mail

Looking for a Major? How about majoring in the Physical Sciences?

Lower-division requirements for Physical Sciences Majors

Majors
Math
Physics
Chemistry
Other
Comments

1A - 1B
53 - 54, 55

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Stat 20 or 25 is required for the Teaching Concentration only
Astrophysics

1A - 1B
53-54

7A-7B-7C

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See Astronomy. Required Astro 7A-7B

Computer Science
1A - 1B 54
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61A, 61B, 61C, 70

Earth & Planetary Science (6 Majors)
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Visit 305 McCone for program planning for any of the six Earth and Planetary Science majors or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it for an appointment.
Atmospheric, Geophysics, Planetary Science
1A - 1B,
53-54
7A-7B-7C
1A
EPS 50

Geology

1A - 1B

7A - 7B
1A
EPS 50

Environmental Earth Science, Marine Science
16A-16B or 1A, 1B
8A-8B or 7A-7B
1A
EPS 50, Bio 1B

Operations Research and Management Science (ORMS)
1A - 1B
53 - 54
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Engin 7
For more information, contact Anayancy Paz at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Physics
1A - 1B
53 - 54
7A-7B-7C


Good HS Chemistry or College Chemistry recommended

Statistics

1A - 1B
53 - 54

 

 

 

Recommended 2, 20, 21, 25, 0r 131A

**The information provided above is subject to change.  It is strongly recommended that you see an advisor from the major for more detailed information**

 

Applied Mathematics/Mathematics

http://math.berkeley.edu/

Thomas Brown

965 Evans Hall

(510) 643-9292

Jennifer Sixt

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

964 Evans Hall

(510) 643-4148

The Department of Mathematics offers two undergraduate programs leading to a B.A. degree: mathematics and applied mathematics.  Both majors give the student a strong, well-rounded mathematical background and provide excellent preparation for graduate study in mathematics, statistics, computer science, or operations research as well as the professional study of law, medicine, business, or education.   They also prepare students for a wide range of careers in industry and government.

The major in applied mathematics includes a cluster of courses in an area where mathematics are applied, such as actuarial science, computer science, economics, numerical analysis, operations research, quantum mechanics, or statistics.

A new teaching concentration is offered as part of the Mathematics major and is designed to increase the number and quality of math teachers. It includes a modification to the typical major course sequence and has an additional lower-division requirement of Statistics 20 or 25.

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Astronomy

http://astro.berkeley.edu/

Dexter Stewart

611 Campbell Hall

(510) 642-8520

The study of astronomy provides good training in problem-solving capabilities, logical thinking, and the ability to synthesize a variety of information which is relevant to a given problem or phenomenon. 

The Department of Astronomy offers undergraduate majors instruction in a wide variety of fields, including theoretical and observational astrophysics; infrared, optical, and radio astronomy; galactic structure and dynamics of stellar systems; high-energy astrophysics and cosmology; and spectroscopy.  The major is also intended to be useful to students who do not contemplate a career in research astronomy, but who might want to work with government agencies (e.g. NASA), aerospace companies, or in a general quantitatively oriented career.

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Computer Science

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/

Barbara Hightower

377 Soda Hall

(510) 642-7214

Our emphasis is on the science of computer science. It includes the design and analysis of algorithms, complexity theory, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, database systems, machine architecture and logic design, operating systems, database systems, programming systems, security, and programming languages and compiler design. Our goal is to prepare students both for a possible research career and long-term technical leadership in industry. We must give students the big ideas and the learning skills that will prepare them to teach themselves about tomorrowís technology. A bachelorís degree in CS qualifies one for a diverse variety of interesting positions: design teams on large systems projects; applications programming or technical writing; positions that are only partly technical, such as in computer marketing or sales; work for Fortune 500 companies, small Silicon Valley start-ups, or to be self-employed.

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Earth and Planetary Science

http://eps.berkeley.edu/

Catherine Pauling


305 McCone Hall

(510) 643-4068

If you love the planet earth and beyond, EPS may be the major for you.  Students choose from one of six tracks ñ geology, geophysics, atmospheric science, planetary science, environmental earth science, and marine science.  Our classes are relatively small and highly interactive, allowing students ample opportunities to interact personally with faculty and graduate students; many of our courses include field trips to a variety of sites in the western region and opportunities to learn computer and global positioning systems applications.  The department also offers a number of research opportunities for undergraduates.

Many of our majors continue to graduate school.  A number of geoscientists work in private industry.  Petroleum companies, mining and quarrying companies, engineering and environmental consulting and construction firms are among potential employers.  The government, at the federal and state level, colleges and universities, non-profit research institutions, and museums also hire EPS graduates.

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Operations Research and Management Science (ORMS)

http://ieor.berkeley.edu/

Anayancy Paz


4145 Etcheverry Hall

(510) 642-5485

ORMS is a discipline-spanning major.  It provides a unique opportunity to develop analytical and math-modeling skills, as well as a deep understanding of an area of application, such as sociology, economics, or industrial and service systems.  The major is new, but we expect our graduates to help understand issues and solve problems in health care, public policy, human resource management, etc.

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Physics

http://physics.berkeley.edu/  

Claudia Trujillo
368 LeConte Hall

(510) 642-0481

Physics is the study of the universe, from the very large (star formation, cosmic microwave background radiation) to the very small (nanotechnology, atomic cooling and trapping, string theory), and everything in between (biophysics, and the physics of solid state devices, just to name a few).  Our undergraduate program aims to provide a broad and solid background in fundamental physics through introductory course work, and then to engage all our majors who are interested in current research with some of the top research groups worldwide.

We believe a Physics degree represents strong training for a broad range of careers.  Approximately half of our recent graduates have continued to graduate school in Physics and related fields; others have taken jobs in high tech industries or as management consultants, and still others have entered medical school.  We aim to help our majors develop strong mathematical and analytical skills, good laboratory skills, effective written and oral communication skills, and of course a solid understanding of the fundamental laws that govern the universe.

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Statistics

http://www.stat.berkeley.edu

Denise Yee

367A Evans Hall

(510) 643-6131

Statistics provides a mathematical and conceptual framework for understanding randomness and uncertainty and the computational framework for working with data, including massive datasets that arise in fields such as computational biology, astrophysics, and the Internet. The educational and research activities of the faculty and students span a broad range of topics in statistics and probability. Many faculty are actively involved in statistical problems that arise in such diverse fields as finance, genetics, molecular biology, astronomy, geophysics and planetary physics, the US Census, clinical trials, neurophysiology, sociology, political science, education, elections, and demography.  Typical future careers for statistics graduates are in the quantitative side of finance and banking, biotechnology, the pharmaceutical industry, web search, targeted marketing, market research and polling, actuarial and insurance work, and various arms of the government such as the Census Bureau and the National Security Agency.

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