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research [2012/01/20 23:35]
Dillon Wong
research [2013/09/16 18:57] (current)
Ivan Pechenezhskiy
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===== Molecular Machines ===== ===== Molecular Machines =====
-| [[research:molecular-machines|{{:research:cis.png?nolink&100 |}}]] | | Though historically difficult to control at a truly molecular level, NEMS (nano-electro-mechanical systems) have exciting potential technological applications. With STM, we build and explore the physics of new systems whose electro-mechanical state can be remotely switched. Our goal is to assemble these into funtional molecular machines. //[[research:molecular-machines|Read more...]]// |+| [[research:molecular-machines|{{:research:cis.png?nolink&100 |}}]] | | Though historically difficult to control at a truly molecular level, NEMS (nano-electro-mechanical systems) have exciting potential to advance technological applications. With STM, we explore the physics of new bottom-up fabricated molecular structures whose electro-mechanical state can be remotely switched with light. Our goal is to assemble these structures into functional molecular machines. //[[research:molecular-machines|Read more...]]// | 
 +| ::: | | The mechanical oscillatory response of surface-adsorbed molecules are also within the scope of this project. The vibrational properties of molecules are typically probed via infrared and Raman spectroscopies. In our lab we have been developing new techniques, referred to as IRSTM, that combine infrared spectroscopy (IR) and STM. //[[http://physics.aps.org/articles/v6/101|Read more about our advances in this direction...]]// |
===== Spin-Polarized Nanostructures ===== ===== Spin-Polarized Nanostructures =====
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=====Nanophotovoltaics===== =====Nanophotovoltaics=====
-| {{:research:a-d.jpg?100&nolink |}} | | As an alternative to semiconductor solar cells, it is possible to engineer nanoscale elements in large quantities to form composite photovotaics with spatially distributed p-n interfaces. Our group is exploring nanophotovoltaic interfaces with the goal of understanding and optimizing the processes of converting sunlight into usable electrical energy in molecular-scale structures. |+| {{:research:a-d.jpg?100&nolink |}} | | Current state-of-the-art solar cells require carefully processed semiconducting interfaces that extend over macroscopic distances (i.e., extended p-n junctions). An alternative method for creating solar cells, however, is to engineer nanoscale elements that can be combined to create microscopic p-n junctions. These can then be combined in large quantities to create composite photovoltaics with spatially distributed p-n interfaces. A benefit of this approach is that such nano-photovoltaic building blocks can be mass-produced cheaply and so this technique is potentially more scalable than current state-of-the-art semiconductor photovoltaics. The downside is that nano-photovoltaics currently have very low efficiencies. Our group is currently exploring the microscopic physics of nano photovoltaic interfaces, with the goal of understanding and optimizing the processes that allow us to convert sunlight into usable electrical energy in molecular-scale structures. |
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