Department Colloquia

Public lectures and outreach events bring to life the fascinating science of our own faculty as well as the work of accomplished scientists from around the world. Bringing this knowledge to the fore is an important part of the mission of Physics at Berkeley. Our events include weekly Departmental Colloquia and Condensed Matter Physics Seminars

News

November 10, 2021

Monday, November 22, 2021

Join us for the Physics Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m.

Title: Electrically charged skyrmions and superconductivity

November 9, 2021

Monday, November 15, 2021

Join us for the Physics Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m.

Title: What must change for things not to stay the same? 

October 28, 2021

Monday, November 8, 2021

Join us for the Physics Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m.

Title: Exploring the Unexplored: Searching for Dark Matter in the mass range from 10meV-1GeV.

October 20, 2021

Monday, September 20, 2021

Join us for the Physics Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m.

Title:
Cosmic alchemy in the era of gravitational wave astronomy 

October 14, 2021

Monday, October 18, 2021

Join us for the Physics Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m.

Title: Can a solid-state quantum simulator help us understand materials?

October 10, 2021

Monday, October 25, 2021

Join us for the Physics Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m.

Title: Many-body physics with arrays of individual atoms and optical dipoles

Tour Eiffel

October 5, 2021

Monday, October 11, 2021

Join us for the Physics Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m.

Title: The Art of the Impossible: Probing Challenging Higgs Channels at the LHC

September 29, 2021

Monday, October 4, 2021

Join us for the Physics Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m.

Location: Zoom Webinar
Webinar ID: 938 4556 6700
https://berkeley.zoom.us/j/93845566700

Title:
Node-Pore Sensing: How a (Humble) Four-Terminal Measurement Can Measure the Mechanical Properties of Single Cells

April 28, 2021

Monday, April 12, 2021

Learn about how neutrinos behave in truly exotic environments in our universe, with Professor Wick Haxton.

Monday, April 19, 2021

Topological quantum computing relies on qubits encoded in quantum states that are exponentially protected from local perturbations. One method for realizing such protected states is a practical recipe for topological superconductivity: hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanowires in finite magnetic fields. In this talk I will describe experimental methods for identifying and manipulating the topological phase and associated Majorana quasiparticles in these devices.