Can We Talk? Difficult Conversations with Underrepresented People of Color

Monday, April 19, 2021 to Tuesday, April 20, 2021

The MPS division is hosting a division-wide screening and subsequent live panel discussion of Dr. Kendall Moore's film, Can We Talk? Difficult Conversations with Underrepresented People of Color: Sense of Belonging and Obstacles to STEM Fields. Watch the trailer below, and download a flyer here.

 

 

The film will be available to stream:
Monday, April 19th - Thursday, April 22nd
The live Panel Discussion will be held on:
Friday, April 23rd from 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM PT

Register for both the screening and the live panel discussion:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/film-screening-panel-discussion-can-we-talk...

  • Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email (if also registering for the live panel discussion, you will receive a link to the Zoom Webinar.)
  • A reminder email will be sent out on Monday, April 19th; this email will contain the link and password to access the screening on a web browser.

Registration ends on Monday, April 19th. 

About this Event

The University of California, Berkeley Division of Mathematical and Physical Science invites you to a division-wide virtual screening and subsequent live panel discussion of Dr. Kendall Moore's film, "Can We Talk?". This is the first film in this series and it explores the issue of ‘social belonging’ in the context of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) and the effect it has on the lives of underrepresented people of color (UR-POC) who are pursuing an education or career in STEM; or, have decided to leave because of an overwhelming feeling of not belonging.

The film has screened at venues across the U.S., at scientific conferences, colleges and universities, federal agencies, and for non-profit organizations. In post-discussion screenings, it has become explicitly clear that institutions want to expand the STEM workforce to include UR-POC, but how to do that, moving forward, requires a better understanding of the lives lived (currently and historically) of UR-POC.